Mission Statement

The mission of the Buckhead Community Improvement District is to create and maintain a safe, accessible and livable urban environment. We meet the challenges of growth by investing tax dollars collected from commercial property owners within the district, as well as other funds we leverage from outside the district, to make meaningful improvements in the transportation network and public realm that connect people and places.

Our Staff

FAQs

What is a community improvement district (CID)?

CIDs are not non-profit organizations, but are best defined as “local government entities”.  Authorized by Article IX, Section VII of the Georgia Constitution, a CID is a mechanism for funding certain governmental services including street and road construction and maintenance, parks and recreation, storm water and sewage systems, water systems, public transportation systems, and other services and facilities. The administrative body of the CID may levy taxes, fees and assessments within the CID, not to exceed 2.5 percent of the assessed value of the real property. Such taxes, fees and assessments may only be levied on real property that is used for non-residential purposes and revenues may be used only to provide governmental services and facilities within the CID. Bonded debt is permitted, but such debt may not be considered an obligation of the state or any other unit of government other than the CID.  In 2010, the Council for Quality Growth created this video to explain CIDs.

What is the Buckhead CID tax millage and how much has been raised and spent?

Non-residential property owners within the CID pay an additional 3 mils (3 dollars for every $1,000 in assessed property value) of property taxes to fund the CID’s operations. A total of approximately $61.5 million in taxes has been spent or obligated since the inception of the CID in late 1999 through 2014.  Through 2014 we have attracted an additional investment of approximately $102 million from other sources which has helped our tax dollars to go further. Almost 97% of funds raised have gone directly to our projects, plans and programs, with only 3% going toward administrative expenses, which includes management of our projects and programs.

With such a small staff, how does the CID get its work done?

We do our work through partnership and collaboration with various organizations and institutions, as well as by contracting out considerable planning, design, construction, and maintenance work. (We are also pretty darned good at what we do.) The Buckhead Community Improvement District seeks to provide opportunities for disadvantaged and/or minority-owned businesses in its contracts and has a goal of 15% participation by such qualified organizations.

How big is the CID?

Roughly 1,594 acres, or about 2.5 square miles.

What opportunities exist for the public to review and comment on Buckhead CID activities?

All monthly meetings of the Buckhead CID board of directors are open to the public. Dates, times and the location of these meetings can be found on the “Events” link on this website. The CID also has a strong history of reaching out to diverse stakeholders, including property owners, business owners, civic organizations, and residents, for input into our plans, projects, and programs.

GA400/MARTA Bridge

Status: Complete! 

On March 7, 2012, Buckhead CID joined officials from MARTA, the Federal Transit Administration, the City of Atlanta and the State Road and Toll Authority to break ground on a $32 million pedestrian bridge that spans GA 400, connecting two disconnected quadrants in Buckhead and creating a new entrance to MARTA’s Buckhead Station. 

Buckhead CID was instrumental in building consensus and support among Buckhead businesses, developers and community leaders.  In addition, Buckhead CID helped assemble the necessary funding, including $1.2 million from the organization. 

The MARTA Pedestrian Bridge was officially opened to the public after a ribbon-cutting ceremony at noon on June 24th, 2014.  Pedestrians from Tower Place Drive and Stratford Road on the north side of Peachtree now have direct access to both sides of GA 400 and to MARTA’s Buckhead Station without having to walk to Peachtree Road, making existing and future development transit-accessible. 

The MARTA Concourse Bridge will provide more than 3,000 people who live, work, shop and worship in the area with a more practical rail transit alternative.

Pedestrian Connectivity

Status: Complete!

In 2010 and 2011, the Buckhead CID funded a study to identify pedestrian connectivity opportunities within a specific 45-acre block of Buckhead bounded by North Stratford Road, Peachtree Road and Lenox Road/the Buckhead Loop.  While still developing, this block is already home to more than 14,000 residents and employees. The area has a mix of uses within walking distance of each other, including office, residential, retail and hotel. It also is within only a 6-minute walk of MARTA’s Buckhead transit station, making it a legitimate transit option for pedestrians.  However, the area’s “super block” structure and lack of connectivity impedes these qualities, hampering access to transit and discouraging walking as a viable option for even small trips.

The study created a long-term vision and identified specific short-, medium- and long-term opportunities for adding and strengthening pedestrian circulation within this block and to surrounding destinations.  The study’s recommendations are currently being implemented. Further, MARTA constructed a new entrance for the Buckhead station to better accommodate area pedestrians.

Greenspace Action Plan

While Buckhead proudly boasts many world-class buildings, retailers and residences, it is woefully lacking in greenspace. This issue was noted in the City of Atlanta’s Project Greenspace, the City’s 2009 master plan. This study identified Buckhead’s City Council District 7 as having less greenspace than any other district in the city.

The Buckhead CID funded the development of a Greenspace Action Plan in 2010 and 2011 to provide:

  • An understanding of realistic funding, operations, management and maintenance opportunities;
  • A clear definition of the needs and desires of Buckhead residents, workers, business owners and key stakeholders;
  • A detailed, realistic greenspace vision, dubbed “The Buckhead Collection,” based on community needs, existing conditions, appropriate standards and sound greenspace system planning principles from the best greenspace systems around the world; and
  • An action-oriented implementation strategy that identifies estimated costs, priorities, potential partnerships, alternative funding sources, phasing strategies and the specific actions – and responsibilities – to implement the vision.

What emerged was a truly collaborative public, private and nonprofit agency strategy for the implementation of the greenspace plan.  Livable Buckhead is charged with the implementation of the plan and the Buckhead CID will provide further funding as appropriate.

Piedmont Corridor Study

Status: Complete!

Approximately 450 Buckhead residents, commuters, employers, business leaders and community leaders came together in 2007 and 2008 to tackle Piedmont Road’s congestion issues head on, creating a shared vision for the future. This major planning effort was funded by the Buckhead CID. The result is a $200 million plan encompassing 47 projects that will allow the corridor to function more smoothly for all users.  Many of the recommendations have been implemented.

Peachtree Fiscal Impact – need update

A study of the economic and fiscal impacts of the Peachtree Corridor on the region was completed in 2014 on behalf of the Buckhead CID, the Midtown Improvement District, and Atlanta Downtown Improvement District by Bleakly Advisory Group.

Click the link below to read the report.

Village Street Redesign

Buckhead CID worked with stakeholders to develop a long-term vision for roadway and public space within the Buckhead Village area. The five-month planning study produced concepts for portions of Peachtree Road, Roswell Road and East Paces Ferry in close proximity to Charlie Loudermilk Park.

The study included alternative intersection locations for commuters, pedestrians and cyclists that will promote walkability and bikeability. A short-term option under consideration could be implemented before redevelopment of the area occurs. The study also determined ideal long-term projects that will accommodate and promote the area’s future development. Some aspects of these projects are currently underway in the Village Streetscape Buckhead Construction effort.

Restripping Project

Status: Restriping is in progress on West Paces Ferry Road. Work on East Paces Ferry and Pharr Roads is complete.

The Buckhead CID worked with traffic engineering consultants and the Department of Public Works to redesign how West Paces Ferry, East Paces Ferry and Pharr Roads carry traffic.

The West Paces Ferry Road redesign will restore most of the auto vehicle capacity, retain a bike lane on the south side and add a mid-block crossing between One Buckhead Plaza and Whole Foods.

The East Paces Ferry Road redesign will change the intersection at Bolling Way so that cars using Bolling Way to get to Peachtree Road northbound will turn left from a dedicated lane while cars continuing east will need to merge or stay in the right lane. This should alleviate last second weaving at the intersection and make it safer for pedestrians to cross East Paces Ferry Road.

The Pharr Road redesign will add a center left turn lane and bike lanes by converting two existing through lanes.

SPI-9

Buckhead CID partnered with the City of Atlanta, Livable Buckhead, commercial property owners and local residents through Neighborhood Planning Unit (NPU) B to update a special public interest zoning ordinance (SPI-9) that covers a significant part of the Buckhead commercial area west of Piedmont Avenue and north of Pharr Road.  Buckhead CID paid for the work, leveraging additional funds from an Atlanta Regional Commission’s Livable Centers Initiative grant.

The new zoning, adopted by Atlanta City Council on October 4, 2010, set the stage for a more walkable, village-scale, urban community enriched with public art and parks, wide sidewalks, greenspace, transportation options and outdoor dining. The new district enhances existing regulations by clearly defining street treatments, facades, sidewalk widths, signage, greenspace and other public elements to create a cohesive community feel and helps developers position their developments with consideration of public spaces.

Click here to learn more about SPI-9 and download documents.

Buckhead CID SPI-9 Area

SPI-12

Similar to the SPI-9 zoning, Buckhead CID partnered with the City of Atlanta, Livable Buckhead, commercial property owners and local residents through Neighborhood Planning Unit (NPU) B to update a special public interest zoning ordinance (SPI-12) that covers the core Buckhead commercial area east of Piedmont Avenue and north of Peachtree Road.  This area includes two regional malls (Lenox Square and Phipps Plaza), high-rise office buildings and two MARTA rail transit stations. Buckhead CID paid for the consulting work, leveraging additional funds from an Atlanta Regional Commission’s Livable Centers Initiative program grant.

The updated zoning for the area promotes the district as a lifelong living community by accentuating Peachtree Road as the prominent boulevard and creating vibrant streets throughout the district. The zoning will improve connectivity through an improved street network that facilitates safe and convenient pedestrian circulation while minimizing conflict between pedestrians and vehicles. The zoning will encourage dense, sustainable and environmentally-sensitive development, including diverse housing options and open public spaces.  In fact, the zoning minimizes excessive parking requirements and encourages shared parking for open public spaces.  The overall aesthetic of the commercial environment will be improved while protecting the adjacent single-family residential neighborhoods that adjoin the district.

Click here to learn more about SPI-12 and download documents.

Buckhead CID SPI-12 Area